Pirelli scooter tires

pirelli

As I mentioned somewhere earlier in this recent rash of scooter posts, my wife and I ride a couple of relatively new 150cc Roketa scooters that we purchased from Urbano Moto in Bellingham. They are fairly inexpensive Chinese models so I would be foolish not to anticipate regular repairs. The fact is that neither of us would be enjoying scooters if we had to pony up the cost of a Honda or Vespa.

I initially went through the scooters checking all bolts and fasteners for tightness. I found a few loose, but nothing dangerous. I also checked all fuel lines, intake parts and miscellaneous hoses, but found no problems.

My wife’s Carpi (Carpi not Capri) has been really trouble free, while I haven’t been so lucky with my Fiji. The Fiji came from the factory with a bad rear wheel hop over about 40 mph. I deflated and reseated the tire which ever so slightly improved the ride, but it still seemed dangerous. Urbano moto was more than willing to correct the problem with a tire and or wheel change as needed. But with the usually wet roads we have in the NW I was already planning on replacing the budget tires with something a bit higher up the scale.

I settled on a set of Pirelli SL26 tires which they describe as being made from an “all year use” compound” and having big grooves and blocks in the tread pattern to give good wet weather performance. I purchased online from Tires Unlimited and the order went off without a hitch. I spent about $50 a piece including shipping for a pair of 130/60-13’s and had them mounted at Mt. Baker Motorsports for a rather inexpensive price that I now can’t recall.

And the results were as I had hoped; no more wheel hop and I’m riding a set of quality tires that really stick to the road.  They stick well on dry roads, wet roads, a bit of sand on the roads and the oily strip too. They stick so well that I have to continually remind myself, especially coming up on corners, that I’m on a scooter.

Puig 992 touring windscreen

puig 992 b It took me about 15 years of street bike riding before I gave into a small windscreen. I was young, and thought it wasn’t to cool have one. With the scooter I had one ordered within the first week. What I’m saying is that I was really stupid in the past and I’m not as stupid now, at least as far as windscreens go.

A windscreen offers protection from rain, flying debris and constant wind buffeting. The right windscreen can do all those things and also make your scooter more aerodynamic. At any normal speed the lack of aerodynamics on a motorcycle just means that you have to hang on tighter. With a scooter’s modest power, wind resistance plays a big role in top speed. With the Puig 992 on my 150 cc scooter, I think that I am seeing 4-5 mph increase in top speed. Out on the 50 mph county roads that means I am part of the traffic rather than an obstacle.

puig 992 By the way, the windscreen I choose was the Puig 992 touring model. At letsgoscootin.com, I saw a few photos of the touring model on a scooter that was very similar to mine. I thought it fit well and looked good. Additionally, the author gave it good marks. I purchased it online through CBXMAN Motorcycles for the going price of $129. Whether it was the going price or not, I still thought it was expensive. Everyone was out of stock, so I didn’t expect to find discounting and I ended up waiting about 7 weeks for delivery. Customer service at CBXMAN was great, even considering the long out of stock time. I’d gladly shop there again.

So, bottom line is that the Puig 992 windscreen offers protection, improved aerodynamics and a little bit of style. I give it a thumbs up.

Scooterism

carpi.jpgToday many people, yes even middle aged conservative Christian white guys, are stepping through two-wheelers for one reason or another. Maybe fun, maybe practicality, maybe $3.50/gallon gas. For me, it might just be in my blood. I grew up riding everything from a 2-1/2 hp Lil’ Indian minibike, to a Solex Moped, to various, mostly sport touring, motorcycles. I’ve logged hundreds of thousands of miles on real motorcycles and even tens of thousands of miles on pedal variety two wheelers. But, with real life setting in, those motorcycling days soon faded into the distant past. I became a used to ride guy.

Last spring my wife suggested that she get a fun little scooter to ride around. I was all for her having fun, but when she suggested I get a scooter also, my thoughts were of embarrassment, not fun. So we bought her a nice little silver scooter and you have never seen a perma-grin until you’ve seen the one on my wife’s face while she is riding. I didn’t get a scooter. However, I did have to swallow my pride a few times and ride her scooter over to the high school so she could do some parking lot riding practice.

fiji-150.jpgIt was while making these rides, that some peculiar things happened. First, I found that 2 wheels are fun even without a clutch nor anything resembling horsepower. The second, and more peculiar thing came one day when a Harley rider gave me the courtesy wave as we approached each other. I thought what the heck, and waved back. But as he got close, he realized that he was waving to a scooter ; so he quickly pulled his wave and looked down as we passed. The irony hit me like a brick; I was on a scooter having fun while he was riding a Harley, a real motorcycle, and feeling embarrassed. A few days later I ordered my own red sporty Roketa Fiji 150 scooter from Urbano Moto.

As weather allows, I scooter for fun and often commute to work. My wife still scooters just for the grin. Our kids are still too small to reach the pegs, so as babysitting allows, we scooter together for fun.

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