Posts Tagged ‘Republican Party’

It’s not a partisan gap, it’s Democrats

Saturday, June 9th, 2012

When I look at our financial state of affairs in Olympia I don’t see a partisan gap issue as many in the news have said, I see a problem with the Democrats who have had too much control and for too long.   The real problem is not that there is a gap between the Republican Party and the Democratic Party, the real problem is that there is a large gap between the will of the people of Washington and the will of the party in power, the Democrats.  

It’s no secret that many of our financial issues stem from government overspending and it takes only the average person to understand that to fix things we need to limit the taxes that are feeding our state’s spending addiction. 

  • 1993 – Voters pass Initiative 601 which demands that “state expenditures be limited by inflation rates and population growth, and taxes exceeding the limit be subject to referendum?”
  • 1998 – Voters pass Referendum 49 which says that “motor vehicle excise taxes be reduced and state revenues reallocated; $1.9 billion in bonds for state and local highways approved; and spending limits modified?"
  • 2007 – Voters pass Initiative 960 which “required that in order for the Washington State Legislature to raise taxes, the legislature would have to approve any tax increases with a two-thirds supermajority vote or submit tax increase proposals to a statewide vote of the electorate”
  • 2010 – voters pass Initiative 1053  which requires that "legislative actions raising taxes must be approved by two-thirds legislative majorities or receive voter approval, and that new or increased fees require majority legislative approval."

For two decades the average people of our state have been speaking to this issue and the Democrats we put in power have been ignoring us.   It seems that each time we try to limit spending the Democrats try to limit our power over them by using whatever technicality they think they can get away with. 

In the waning hours of the "budget focused" special session Democrats in the House and Senate both attempted to cue up votes on a tax bill not assumed in the budget that no one expected to pass. The strategy was to try to gain legal standing to sue the voters to overturn the 18 year old 2/3 vote requirement for tax increases.  Washington Policy Center

Approved by 64 percent of voters last November, I-1053 prohibited unelected bureaucrats from unilaterally imposing taxes and fees. After it passed, Gov. Chris Gregoire said: "I’m not gonna let 1053 stand in the way of me moving forward for what I think is right."  Seattle Times

A coalition of House Democrats and education advocates are asking the courts to void the supermajority required for tax increases in Washington, arguing that it’s an unconstitutional limit on legislative authority. The Spokesman-Review

I’m not a lawyer so I can’t speak to the technicalities of the various legislation, loopholes and lawsuits that the Democrats have used, but suffice to say that the Democrat legislation, loopholes and lawsuits were not implemented to properly enact the will of the people, but rather to oppose the will of those who elected them.

There’s a gap for sure, but it is not between political parties, it is between the average people of this state and the Democratic Party.

 

references http://ballotpedia.org

Rocky Road

Monday, March 31st, 2008

rricWalk through the frozen section at Haggen and you will pass by about a hundred varieties of ice cream. We Americans can take our freedom of choice pretty seriously and people can get pretty passionate when it comes to choosing their ice cream. I haven’t traveled the world extensively, but I think it is safe to say we are unique both in our ability to choose a dessert and in the variety we have to choose from.

My favorite is Rocky Road and if I were going to go on a little private binge, that’d be in my bowl. Isn’t binge eating what made Ben & Jerry successful? Ice cream can also be consumed socially, but I think the last time Rocky Road was served at a party, it was my party. Usually compromises are essential for harmony and some non-offensive flavor like vanilla is chosen. Am I disappointed with vanilla? Do I spend what could be a happy event bemoaning the lack of marshmallows, nuts and chocolate? No way! I’ll eat vanilla and savor every spoonful.

Protecting our nation is tops on my list for candidates. Fred Thompson’s expounded national protection in his First Principles.

Protecting our Country. The first responsibility of the federal government is to protect the nation and the American people. There is no more important task. We must have a strong and effective military, capable intelligence services, and a vigorous law enforcement and homeland security capacity.

Originally I was for Fred Thompson, but settled for Mitt Romney when the market was out of Fred. Now at the party, I find John McCain served up as the centrist vanilla compromise. Am I disappointed? Will I bemoan the lack of this or that in John McCain? No way!

SolyentGreen28dAt the Democratic Party they are serving up nothing but Soylent Green. So even though I still value Fred Thompson’s principles, and Ron Paul’s conservatism, at the Republican Party I will enjoy and savor every spoonful of John McCain.